Risky Business: The Business of Risk

Sunday, April 27, 2014

What is it

There is an element of risk – either to ourselves or to others – in almost everything we do. By deciding to go to the grocery store, for example, we take a (very small) risk of getting into a car accident. Many risks are acceptable, of course, but how do we know when a risk is worth taking? The most important decisions, after all, are often risky ones. What about risks to others' welfare? How do we, and should we, take risk into account when we make decisions? John and Ken take their chances with Lara Buchak from UC Berkeley, author of Risk and Rationality.

Listening Notes

We inevitably take risks all the time: every time that we act without knowing what the result will be, we are taking a risk. Are some risks more rational to take than others? If so, what determines the rationality of a risk? John and Ken discuss the complex nature of risk and risk assessment with UC Berkeley professor of philosophy, Lara Buchak. Despite the common belief that expected utility theory is the best guidance to risk-taking, Buchak argues that it allows too little of an individual's preferences to come into the equation.

Given that expected utility theory can account for how much individuals value possible outcomes in light of their probabilities, John and Ken question what could possibly be missing from the theory. Buchak explains that the theory neglects how much value the individual can place on the safety of a sure bet or the grand potential of a more chancy one. A person may be more risk-averse or more risk-seeking, and this aspect is left unaccounted for by expected utility theory. While John questions this with an example involving Russian roulette, Buchak stands by her conception of rationality in risk assessment.

When an audience member brings up the issue of how to assess risk on behalf of others, Ken notes that the discussion around this form of risk is likely to be about ethics rather than rationality. Buchak agrees, and further addresses this in response to more of the audience's questions. As the show nears its close, Buchak argues for the unintuitive stance that, in some cases, gathering less information about a choice is actually the best option. John and Ken remain somewhat skeptical.

 
 

Lara Buchak, Professor of Philosophy, UC Berkeley

 
 
 

Bonus Content

 

VIDEO: Opening montage

MUSIC: The Plāto'nes, Someday Soon

MUSIC: The Plāto'nes, Didn't It Rain

 

Research By

Tyler Haddow
 

Upcoming Shows

16 December 2018

Foreign Aid – or Injury?

Many of us might think that developed nations should lead the effort to end global poverty. But decades of foreign aid—from governments and non-...

23 December 2018

The Ancient Cosmos - When the Earth...

Even in ancient Greek society, philosopher-scientists engaged in heated debate about the origin, composition, and structure of our universe....

30 December 2018

The Examined Year: 2018

A new year offers an opportunity to reflect on the significant events of the previous year. But what ideas and events took shape over the past twelve...