Baldwin, Truth, and Social Justice

Sunday, February 11, 2018

What is it

Sometimes, we struggle to tell the truth -- especially when it's the truth about ourselves. Why did James Baldwin, a prominent Civil Rights-era intellectual and novelist, believe that telling the truth about ourselves is not only difficult but can also be dangerous? How can truth deeply unsettle our assumptions about ourselves and our relations to others? And why did Baldwin think that this abstract concept of truth could play a concrete role in social justice? The Philosophers seek their own truth with Christopher Freeburg from the University of Illinois, author of Black Aesthetics and the Interior Life.

 
 

Christopher Freeburg, Conrad Humanities Scholar and Professor of English, University of Illinois

 
 

Bonus Content

 

Research By

Mohit Mookim
 

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